• Sugar policy gives farmers a fighting chance to survive low prices caused by unneeded imports and increasing foreign subsidies.
  • Sugar farmers don’t receive government subsidy checks. Instead producers receive loans that are repaid with interest.
  • Sugar policy cost taxpayers $0 in ’03, ’04, ’05, ’06, ’07, ’08, ’09, ’10, ’11, ’12, ’14, ’15, and ‘16.
  • Among the only blemishes on sugar’s no-cost record came in 2013 when the USDA took action to keep the market from collapsing after Mexico violated U.S. trade law and dumped subsidized sugar.
  • The Congressional Budget Office estimates that sugar policy will cost $0 over the life of the current Farm Bill.
  • USDA estimates that sugar policy will cost $0 through, at least, 2027.
  • Sugar is the least expensive commodity policy in the Farm Bill.
  • Candy companies unsuccessfully lobbied for a sugar subsidy during the 2008 Farm Bill that would’ve cost taxpayers an estimated $1.3 billion a year.
  • U.S. sugar policy ensures we’re not dependent on unreliable foreign producers for an ingredient essential to the U.S. food supply.
  • Under U.S. sugar policy, America is still among the world’s biggest sugar importers.
  • 38 of America’s foreign sugar suppliers are developing countries and most support U.S. sugar policy.
  • Sugar costs less today than when Jimmy Carter sat in the Oval Office, yet the price of candy, cookies, and other sweet treats continues to increase.
  • More than 40 sugar factories have closed since 1993 because of low, stagnant prices, and more than 109,000 sugar related jobs have been lost as a result.
  • Grocery shoppers in other countries pay, on average, 20% more for sugar than Americans.
  • U.S. food manufacturers pay about the same for sugar as their counterparts abroad, according to the International Sugar Organization.
  • U.S. sugar prices include shipping, storage, and refining costs, unlike the foreign prices that sugar policy critics often cite.
  • America’s sugar producers support 142,000 U.S. jobs in 22 states and generate nearly $20 billion a year for the U.S. economy.
  • About half of America’s sugar comes from cane, the other half from beets.
  • America’s beet farmers are the lowest cost beet growers in the world, and U.S. cane growers are among the most efficient despite having much higher environmental and labor standards than foreign competitors.
  • 100% of sugar beet companies are farmer owned, and farmers or employees own 90% of refined sugarcane production.
  • Trade deals force America to import sugar from 41 countries regardless of our needs.
  • Seven out of 10 Americans prefer buying homegrown sugar, even if foreign sugar were cheaper.
  • Dependence on foreign sugar in WWII forced the government to ration sugar. Those events helped spur the U.S. industry.
  • The world sugar market is a thinly traded, heavily subsidized dump market that is the world’s most volatile commodity market.
  • Only about 25% of sugar produced around the globe is traded on the world market because of the distortions caused by foreign subsidies.
  • 120 countries produce sugar and almost all of them have subsidies of some kind.
  • Using $2.5 billion a year in subsidies, Brazil now controls 50% of global sugar exports—by comparison, Saudi Arabia controls just 19% of crude oil exports.
  • The Mexican government directly owns a portion of the country’s sugar production, making it Mexico’s biggest producer and exporter.
  • India relies on $1.7 billion in annual subsidies to prop up its inefficient sugar industry.
  • Thailand emerged as the world’s second leading sugar exporter thanks to $1.3 billion a year in subsidies.
  • European sugar growers will soon receive $665 million a year in subsidy checks.
  • U.S. producers support a free world market and elimination of all global sugar policies, but oppose unilateral disarmament.
  • U.S. sugar prices are as low today as 30 years ago, yet the price of a candy bar has increased 300% over that time.
  • A candy bar contained less than two pennies worth of sugar in the 1980s. Sugar still makes up less than two cents, or 1%, of a candy bar’s price tag.
  • Food manufacturers pocket the windfall from falling sugar prices instead of sharing the savings with consumers.
  • U.S. confectioners boast higher profit margins than hospitals, defense contractors, and even Hollywood, according to Yahoo!Finance statistics.
  • Official Census data show that domestic production of candy products has grown since current sugar policy took hold in 2008.
  • The press has reported more than 100 major U.S. expansion projects by candy makers since 2012.
  • Manufacturers of sugar-containing products have seen 3% job growth since 2009, while employment by other food manufacturers has been flat.
  • Over the last 15 years, the largest publicly held sugar-using companies saw share prices jump 136% — nearly triple the growth of the S&P index.
  • Profit margins for big sugar-containing product producers has been 37% higher than other U.S. public companies in the last 15 years.