U.S. Production and Prices

142,000

American jobs – many of which are unionized – that are in jeopardy of being outsourced without sugar policy.

50/50

Approximate split of America’s sugar production between cane and beets.

16%

Increase in sugar production over the last 20 years, on 11% less land, thanks to investments in sustainable farming technologies and techniques.

100%

Percentage of beet processing factories that are farmer-owned — 90% of U.S. cane refining capacity is owned by farmers or employees.

67%

Percentage of Americans who prefer buying U.S.-grown sugar, even if heavily subsidized foreign sugar were cheaper.

90,000

Additional tons of sugar quickly shifted to consumer packaging in 2020 to ensure store shelves stayed stocked during the pandemic – that’s the equivalent of 45 million four-pound sugar bags.

U.S. Sugar Policy and Trade

$0.00

What U.S. sugar policy is designed to cost American taxpayers – that’s because sugar producers are offered interest-bearing loans that they repay rather than subsidy checks.

141

The most recent vote margin in the House in support of U.S. sugar policy – over the past two Farm Bills, Congress has rejected 6 attempts by anti-farm interests to weaken sugar policy.

41

Countries, most of which are developing nations, that benefit from preferential access to the U.S. sugar market, making America the 3rd largest sugar importer in the world.

62%

Percentage of global sugar exports controlled by mega-subsidizers Brazil, Thailand, and India – all of which flood and distort the world market using government subsidies.

1/2

Global sugar prices barely cover half the average cost of producing sugar because of rampant foreign subsidization and the dumping of surpluses.

0-for-0

The free-market global sugar policy supported by U.S. sugar producers, who have agreed to roll back U.S. sugar policy once foreign competitors eliminate their market-distorting programs.

5-3-3

America is the 5th largest producer, 3rd largest importer and 3rd largest market in the world.